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Easy Honey-baked Figs

Impress your guests with this delicious, light dessert that you can make in less than an hour. These easy, honey-baked figs are a classy way to end a meal. 

baked figs with Greek yogurt

I love perfectly ripe fresh figs! Not only do they taste great, but they are nutritional powerhouses, too –  high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals!

Luckily, here in Greece, there are plenty of figs and lots of different varieties. The most popular ones are green and black.

For this recipe, I used a variety called Vasilika, or Royal figs. They’re dark purple, but some have green and pale yellow streaks, too. I like them because they’re a bit sweeter than the green ones. You can use any variety, really, as long as they’re fresh.

These honey-baked figs are divine and so EASY to make! You only need 5 ingredients!  

Whenever I have fresh figs, I usually make jam, but this year, I wanted to develop a new recipe. I decided to infuse different flavors together and bake them. I was really surprised with the outcome! 

I serve them over Greek yogurt (pictured in this post). They look so elegant with the flower-like shape! Perfect for a dinner party!

Aaaaaand, they’re absolutely AMAZING with vanilla ice cream (just about everything is, right?). Of course, they’re great on their own, too!

baked figs with greek yogurt

What do these honey-baked figs taste like?

I would say the taste is a combination of honey and jam, but with a mild, sweet flavor and a hint of nuttiness. The spices, honey, and cognac really enhance the delicate flavors of the fruit. The brown sugar adds a subtle caramel flavor that compliments the figs really well and gently caramelizes them. When you take them out of the oven, there’s a gorgeous red syrup in the baking dish – so good!

WHAT YOU NEED TO MAKE EASY HONEY-BAKED FIGS

Fresh figs – Any variety will do.

Honey – For this recipe, I used Greek flower honey. For a vegan alternative, use maple syrup, instead. 

Dark brown sugar – Perfect for a nice caramel undertone.

Spices – I use cinnamon and nutmeg.

Cognac/Brandy – It adds a nice aroma and really captures the overall flavor without being boozy. Instead of cognac or brandy, you could add a sweet wine, like Mavrodafni. 

HOW TO MAKE EASY HONEY-BAKED FIGS

They are really simple to make. Here’s what to do:

baked figs steps

TIPS FOR SUCCESS

  • You can use any variety of fresh figs, but I find the darker ones are better for this recipe, especially when they are ripe.
  • When you cut the figs, make sure you don’t cut all the way through. That way they keep their pretty flower shape after baking.
  • Use a small baking pan so that the figs are close together and hold their shape. I used a 10 x 7.5 inch / 26 x 19.5 cm pan.
  • Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

IDEAS FOR SERVING HONEY-BAKED FIGS

Here are a few ideas you may want to try:

  • Serve them just as they are! If you’re a fig lover, you will really like them on their own, especially with some walnuts. 
  • With Greek yogurt. The tanginess of the yogurt really pairs well with the syrup and the fruit. If you’re entertaining, this would make a very impressive dessert, too!
  • With vanilla ice cream. OMG! A remarkable combination!
  • Over oatmeal. This would make a nice breakfast.
  • With bread. You could have them over slices of sourdough bread as a snack or appetizer.
  • With cheese. Add them to your cheese board for a Mediterranian twist! In Greece, they’re sometimes served on top of Greek gruyere cheese or goat cheese. 

Enjoy!

Let me know how these honey-baked figs turn out for you in the comments below! I’d love to hear from you!

~Voula

baked figs with greek yogurt
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5 from 1 vote

Easy Honey-baked Figs

Impress your guests with this delicious, light dessert that you can make in less than an hour. These easy, honey-baked figs are a classy way to end a meal. 
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Appetizer, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American, Greek
Keyword: easy, honey, baked, figs
Servings: 6

Ingredients

  • 12 fresh figs
  • 4 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons cognac or brandy
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • a pinch of freshly ground nutmeg (optional)
  • Greek yogurt or vanilla ice cream and a few walnuts (optional)

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 392 °F / 200 °C.
  • Wash the figs and pat them dry.
  • Cut the figs into quarters, but not all the way through.
  • Line the figs in a pan and open them like a flower.
  • In a small bowl, mix the honey and sugar together.
  • Add a teaspoon of the sugar mixture inside the center of each fig.
  • Pour the cognac/brandy over the figs.
  • Add the nutmeg and cinnamon sticks and bake for about 25 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven and cool for about 5 minutes.
  • Serve with Greek yogurt, vanilla ice cream, or on their own. Garnish with some walnuts, if desired.
  • Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

  • You can use any variety of fresh figs, but I find the darker ones are better for this recipe, especially when they are ripe.
  • When you cut the figs, make sure you don’t cut all the way through. That way they keep their pretty flower shape after baking.
  • Use a small baking pan so that the figs are close together and hold their shape. I used a 10 x 7.5 inch / 26 x 19.5 cm pan.
© Pastry Wishes
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HOW TO MAKE ANCIENT GREEK SESAME BARS (Pasteli)

These delicious sesame bars have been a part of the Greek culinary tradition since ancient times! You only need 2 ingredients to make this nutritious, ancient Greek superfood known today as Pasteli!

ancient greek sesame bars with honey

Pasteli is a classic, Greek snack! Not only is it delicious, but it’s healthy, too!  It’s an incredible treat dating back to ancient Greece!

Sweets in ancient Greece

In ancient Greece, honey was believed to have come from the gods. It comes as no surprise that the ancient Greeks used honey for so many things since granulated sugar did not exist in ancient Greece; it arrived many centuries later. One popular honey and sesame seed delicacy was called Sisami (pronounced see-SA-mee), which is basically what modern-day Greeks refer to as Pasteli.

What is Pasteli?

Pasteli (pronounced pa-STE-lee) is a bar made with sesame seeds and honey. Various ancient Greek texts mention it, including Homer’s Iliad, where it was popular among the warriors. The father of history, Herodotus, also referred to it as “sweet cakes of sesame and honey”.

Variations of Pasteli today

Today, there are variations of Pasteli in the Middle East and around the Mediterranean, too.

In Greece, there is Pasteli made with sugar and/or a combination of nuts and spices. Pasteli made with sugar is hard and crunchy, almost like brittle. Pasteli made with just honey is much softer and chewier.  The recipe in this post uses honey instead of sugar.

Why I think you’ll love this homemade pasteli:

  • There are only 2 main ingredients, with a few optional add-ins.
  • It’s quick.
  • It’s pretty straightforward.
  • It’s very healthy.
  • It tastes great!

The health benefits of Pasteli

Sesame is known to be a great source of fiber, plant protein, and B vitamins. Pasteli is also rich in antioxidants, which are beneficial for overall health.

What you’ll need to make Pasteli

All you need is honey and sesame seeds. I always use good quality Greek honey. I briefly talk about the benefits of Greek honey in this post. Whenever I make desserts with honey, I find that the quality of the honey really makes a huge difference in the overall flavor. So, if you can’t get Greek honey, get the best honey you can or one you like!

How do you make Pasteli?

Different parts of Greece use different methods. Some areas make Pasteli in large metal pots and then the mixture is poured over a large marble slab or wooden board. Then it’s evened out and beaten with a wooden pin to the desired thickness.

Of course, these traditional methods aren’t really ideal for an ordinary kitchen! I have found a much easier way to make it at home.

First of all, I use a nonstick frying pan. It makes cleanup A LOT easier. I also like putting the pasteli in a square pan lined with parchment paper. That way, I can just lift it out and then cut it when it’s ready.

Here’s what I do:

pasteli steps

If you don’t mind uneven slices, don’t use a pan at all! You can just spoon it onto a large sheet of parchment paper, but don’t touch it with your bare hands because it’s very hot!

Why use a pan?

A pan lets me make Pasteli as thick as I want. For example, a small pan will make thicker bars, whereas a larger pan will make thin ones. For this recipe, I used a 9 ½ inch (24.5 cm) pan and the bars came out to about ½ an inch (1 cm) thick. So, if you’re going to use a pan, pick one depending on how thick or thin you want your bars to be.

pasteli ancient greek sesame bars with honey

Add-ins

Here are a few ideas for add-ins to add more flavor:

  • orange or lemon zest
  • almonds, peanuts, or pistachio nuts
  • ground nutmeg
  • wine
  • black pepper – Ancient Greeks used to put a lot of black pepper in a sweet called gastris! Some parts of Greece today still add black pepper to Pasteli! You might want to give it a try!

 TIPS FOR SUCCESS

  • I toast the sesame seeds in a nonstick pan, but you could toast them in the oven (350°F / 180°C) for about 15 minutes.
  • Don’t overcook the Pasteli, otherwise it may become hard.
  • When you spoon the mixture into the pan, don’t touch it! It’s very hot!
  • Cut into bars or squares after about 15-20 minutes. If you wait longer than that, it will be too hard to cut.
  • Store it in an air-tight container at room temperature with sheets of parchment paper between each bar to prevent them from sticking together.

Let me know how this Pasteli turned out for you in the comments below!

I’d love to hear from you!

~Voula

pasteli ancient greek sesame bars with honey
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5 from 1 vote

HOW TO MAKE ANCIENT GREEK SESAME BARS (Pasteli)

These delicious sesame bars have been a part of the Greek culinary tradition since ancient times! You only need 2 ingredients to make this nutritious, ancient Greek superfood known today as Pasteli!
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time6 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Greek
Keyword: ancient Greek, healthy, refined sugar free, honey, sesame

Ingredients

  • 200 g (7 oz) sesame seeds
  • 200 g (7 oz) good quality (Greek) honey
  • a pinch of salt
  • 1-2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  • Line a pan with parchment paper. Set aside.
  • Lightly toast the sesame seeds in a nonstick pan, until light golden brown. Put the toasted seeds in a bowl. Set aside.
  • In the same nonstick pan, heat the honey on medium heat until it bubbles and foams.
  • Add the seeds and all the remaining ingredients and stir continuously until the mixture thickens and isn't runny (about 5-6 minutes).
  • Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and even it out with the back of a spoon. DON'T TOUCH THE MIXTURE WITH YOUR BARE HANDS - IT'S VERY HOT!
  • Put a piece of parchment paper on top and press down to flatten and even out the surface.
  • After about 15-20 minutes, it should easily bend and hold its shape. Lift it out of the pan and cut into bars or squares.
  • Store in an airtight container at room temperature with pieces of parchment paper between each bar/square.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

  • Instead of toasting the sesame seeds in a nonstick pan,  you could toast them in the oven (350°F / 180°C) for about 15 minutes.
  • Don't overcook the mixture, otherwise it may become hard.
  • Cut the Pasteli into bars or squares after about 10-20 minutes. If you wait longer than that, it will be too hard to cut.
  • Pasteli is best on the day it’s made. It becomes a little bit harder the next day, but it still retains its chewiness.
© Pastry Wishes

 

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GREEK HALVA CAKE (STEP-BY-STEP TUTORIAL + VARIATIONS)

This delicious no-bake cake is made with semolina, honey syrup, nuts, and raisins. It’s delicately spiced with cinnamon and cloves.

Greek Halva Cake

Halva (pronounced hal-VA) is a popular Greek dessert. If you’re not familiar with this dessert, it is made with semolina and honey syrup.

This stove-top dessert is pretty straightforward to make and it’s so delicious!

What is halva?

Halva has origins in the Middle East and you can find many different variations in the Balkans and Eastern Europe, too.

Halva is popular in Greece, especially during periods of Orthodox Christian fasting because it’s dairy free and egg free.

In Greece, there are 3 main kinds of halva.

There is a halva called “Halvas Farsalon” (from a region in central Greece called Farsala), which is made with cornstarch, butter, almonds and a unique caramel crust.

Then there’s one made with tahini paste, almonds and/or honey and sugar.

Finally, there’s one made with semolina and honey syrup, which this post is about.

Here’s what you need to make Greek Halva Cake:

halva ingredients

HOW TO MAKE GREEK HALVA CAKE

1 MAKE THE SYRUP – Just put all the syrup ingredients in a saucepan, stir and boil for 5 minutes.

halva syrup

After 5 minutes, remove the spices and the peel. The syrup will be a light caramel color.

honey syrup

2 HEAT THE OIL & TOAST THE SEMOLINA – Heat the oil on medium-high, then add the semolina. Stir continuosly while toasting, otherwise it will burn.

halva pot

3 TOAST UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN – When it turns golden brown, add the raisin and nuts and stir.

halvapot

4 GRADUALLY ADD THE SYRUP – Take the pot off the heat and add the syrup a little bit at a time, allowing the semolina to absorb it. Be careful because it will splatter. When all the syrup has been added, put the pot back on the heat, reduce to low and stir until it thickens.

5 SPOON THE MIXTURE INTO A PREPARED CAKE PAN – Spread the mixture into a cake pan and use the back of a spoon to smooth out and flatten the top.

halva pan

6 ALLOW TO COOL  – Let it cool for about 1 ½ hours, then turn the halva cake over onto a platter, dust with cinnamon, and top with walnuts.

greek halva cake

TIPS FOR SUCCESS:

  • Make sure you have a deep pot like a soup pot because the semolina needs a lot of space when cooking. It will also offer better protection from the splattering when you add the syrup.
  • A long wooden spoon makes stirring easier. The handle will also stay cool while stirring the hot semolina.
  • When you add the semolina to the hot oil, you need to stir constantly so that it doesn’t burn. You’re ready to remove it from the heat when the semolina turns a golden brown and smells toasty. If the semolina burns, it gets dark and the halva will have a bitter aftertaste. Once the semolina is ready, take the pot off the stove before adding the syrup.
  • Let the halva cool for at least an hour before slicing it, otherwise it may fall apart.

halva cake slice

POSSIBLE VARIATIONS:

If you want to customize your Halva cake, feel free to…

  • use different pans/serving bowls. Instead of a bundt pan or cake pan, you could serve the Halva in individual bowls.
  • use different nuts. This cake would be great with pistachios, almonds or even pine nuts!
  • add semisweet/bittersweet chocolate. You could add chunks of semisweet/bittersweet chocolate to the semolina mixture and stir until it melts. You can never go wrong with chocolate!
  • use a different topping. You could top the cake with melted chocolate! Yum!
  • serve it with ice cream or whipped cream. Delish!
  • serve it warm with some extra honey on top. This is how I enjoy Halva cake! I just heat a slice in the microwave and drizzle some honey over it! 😋

I hope you enjoy this Greek Halva Cake!

~Voula 😊

halva cake

Let me know how this Greek Halva Cake turns out for you in the comments below!

I’d love to hear from you!

If you want more yummy Greek desserts, you’ll love these:

GREEK HALVA CAKE (STEP-BY-STEP TUTORIAL + VARIATIONS)

This delicious no-bake cake is made with semolina, honey syrup, nuts, and raisins. It’s delicately spiced with cinnamon and cloves.
Prep Time20 mins
Resting Time1 hr 30 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Greek
Keyword: Greek, Halva, Cake, No-bake, honey, semolina
Servings: 10 -12

Ingredients

For the syrup

  • 5 cups water
  • 2 cups (400 g / 14.2 oz) sugar
  • 2 heaping tablespoons honey (about 50 g / 1.7 oz)
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 5-6 whole cloves
  • 1 whole lemon peel

For the cake

  • 1 cup (250 ml / 8 oz) olive oil
  • 2 cups (400 g / 14.2 oz) coarse semolina (or 1 cup coarse & 1 cup fine)
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • 100 g (3.5 oz) walnuts

For the topping (optional)

  • 1-2 tablespoons honey
  • chopped walnuts
  • cinnamon

Instructions

Prep the pan

  • Lightly grease a bundt pan (or other cake pan) with some olive oil. Set aside.

Make the syrup

  • In a saucepan add all the ingredients listed for the syrup, stir and bring to a boil. Allow it to boil for about 5 minutes. Take it off the heat and remove the spices. Set aside.

Make the cake

  • Heat the olive oil in a deep pot on medium-high heat. Add the semolina and stir with a wooden spoon. Be careful! You need to stir it continuously, otherwise it will burn. When it turns golden brown, add the raisin and nuts and stir. Take the pot off the heat. Carefully pour a little bit of the honey syrup to the semolina and stir constantly until it has absorbed the syrup. Be careful! It will splatter! Add the remaining syrup and put the pot back on the heat, reduce to low and stir until the mixture thickens.
  • Transfer the semolina mixture to the prepared bundt pan and spread the top evenly with the back of a spoon. Allow it to cool completely (about 1 ½ hours).
  • Turn the halva over onto a cake platter/dish. Sprinkle with some cinnamon and top with nuts and honey.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

* Keep the Halva Cake covered in the refrigerator for 4-5 days.
© Pastry Wishes
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Greek Christmas Cookies

Melomakarona – Greek Christmas Honey Cookies

These classic Greek Christmas cookies will fill your house with a warm aroma of spices! My comprehensive guide will break down all the steps, tips and tricks you need to make the perfect Greek honey cookies!

MELOMAKARONA – Greek Christmas Honey Cookies

These traditional Greek Christmas honey cookies are mildly spiced and dipped in honey.

Melomakarona (pronounced mel-o-ma-KA-ro-na) are traditional Christmas cookies that are popular all over Greece. They are thick cookies spiced with clove, nutmeg and cinnamon, and lightly soaked in syrup. If you haven’t made them before, you should definitely give them a try!

What you’ll need:

  • Flour: I use sifted, all-purpose flour together with fine semolina flour. 
  • Oil: I always use a combination of olive oil and light vegetable oil.
  • Spices: A combination of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.
  • Fruit: Some lemon and orange juice, and some orange zest.
  • Alcohol: Cognac or Brandy (optional).
  • Sweeteners: I use confectioner’s sugar, granulated sugar, and honey.
  • Nuts: Chopped walnuts.

Making melomakarona is pretty straightforward and the best thing is you don’t even need a mixer!

Can I make melomakarona without semolina flour?

Traditionally, melomakarona are made with a combination of all-purpose flour and fine semolina flour, but you could make them with just all-purpose flour. Keep in mind, though, that if you don’t use semolina flour, the texture inside will NOT be the same – it will be a bit crumbly. Semolina flour also helps absorb the syrup better as opposed to cookies made with just all-purpose flour.

Can I omit the alcohol?

Sure! Cognac really goes well with the spices, but you can leave it out and still have great melomakarona! 

Why do you use powdered sugar in the dough instead of granulated sugar?

Powdered sugar dissolves a lot better than granulated sugar and results in a more denser cookie consistency, which is perfect for soaking up the syrup. Powdered sugar also contains cornstarch which helps prevent the cookies from spreading too much.

Why do you use a digital scale?

I always use a digital scale to weigh the dough for each cookie BEFORE I bake them. That way they ALL bake evenly at the same time. I think they also look nicer when I put them on a serving platter because they’re all the same size. If you don’t have a digital scale, try and make each piece of dough the same size before baking.

Should they be baked with or without a fan?

An oven with a fan (convection oven) is ideal because the air circulation from the fan creates a uniform temperature inside, baking all the cookies evenly. If your oven doesn’t have a fan, you might want to try rotating the cookie sheets halfway through the baking time, just to make sure all the cookies are evenly baked.

Should the syrup be hot or cold?

Many Greek desserts are made with syrup, which is either used hot or cold, depending on the recipe. In my post Easy Greek Baklava Rolls – Refined Sugar Free , I mention how opinions differ among chefs on whether or not a dessert should be hot when pouring cold syrup on it or the other way around. Some like it hot and some like it cold! I have tried both ways and found that this cookie is sturdier when it’s hot and then dipped into really cold syrup.

MELOMAKARONA – Greek Christmas Honey Cookies

How to make melomakarona in 11 simple steps:

STEP 1: MAKE THE SYRUP FIRST

Make the syrup first, allow it to cool, then put it in the refrigerator.

STEP 2: PREHEAT THE OVEN

Preheat the oven to 180 °C / 350 °F.

STEP 3: PREPARE THE TOPPING

Set the honey and the walnuts aside.

STEP 4: MIX THE FLOURS

Mix the all-purpose flour with the fine semolina flour and set aside.

STEP 5: MIX REMAINING INGREDIENTS FOR DOUGH

Whisk together the wet ingredients with the remaining ingredients for the dough.

STEP 6: MIX WET AND DRY INGREDIENTS

Gently add the dry mixture to the wet mixture and mix by hand. Do not overmix the dough.

STEP 7: REST

Cover the dough and let it rest for about half an hour.

STEP 8: WEIGH EACH PIECE OF DOUGH & SHAPE

Take a piece of dough and weigh it using a digital scale. Each piece should be about 20-25 g / 0.70-88 oz. Make each piece oval and thick. If you don’t have a digital scale, try and make each piece of dough the same size before baking. If you want, you can make a pattern on top using a closed scalloped crimper.

Tip: The pattern helps absorb the syrup and hold the walnuts on top.

STEP 9: BAKE

Place the cookies on a baking sheet and bake for about 25-30’ until they’re golden brown.

STEP 10: SOAK IN SYRUP

When cookies are done, take 7-10 of them and immediately dunk them into the cold syrup. Let them soak for about 40 seconds, dunking them so that they’re submerged in the syrup. Remove with a slotted spoon and place on a serving platter. Repeat with the other cookies.

STEP 11: ADD THE TOPPINGS

Drizzle some honey over the cookies and add the chopped walnuts.

Please let me know how these melomakarona turned out for you in the comments!

I would love to hear from you!

Have a Merry Christmas!

Melomakarona Greek Christmas Honey Cookies

MELOMAKARONA – Greek Christmas Honey Cookies

These classic Greek Christmas cookies will fill your house with a warm aroma of spices! My comprehensive guide will break down all the steps, tips and tricks you need to make the perfect Greek honey cookies!
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Greek
Keyword: Greek Christmas Honey Cookies
Servings: 55 cookies
Author: Voula

Ingredients

For the Syrup

  • 250ml / 1cup / 8 oz water
  • 250 gr / 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 5-6 whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 orange, cut in half
  • 125 ml / 6.5 oz good quality honey

For the Dough

  • 500 g / 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 100 g / 1/2 cup fine semolina flour
  • 200 ml / 3/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 200 ml / 3/4 cup light vegetable oil
  • 30 g / 4 1/2 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground clove
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 tablespoons cognac or brandy (optional)
  • grated orange zest from 1 orange

For the Topping:

  • 120 gr / 1 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 2 tablespoons good quality honey (optional)

Instructions

  • Make the syrup: Wash the orange and cut it in half. Put the orange halves in a large saucepan and add the remaining ingredients for the syrup. Boil for 5 minutes. Then take off the heat and discard the orange halves. Stir in the honey and set aside to cool. Then refrigerate.
  • Preheat the oven to 180°C / 350 °F.
  • In a bowl, mix the all-purpose flour with the fine semolina flour and set aside.
  • In another bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients for the dough.
  • Gently add the flour mixture to the wet mixture and mix by hand. Mix until just combined.
  • Cover the dough and let it rest for about half an hour.
  • If you have a digital scale, take a piece of dough and weigh it. Each piece should be about 20 - 25 g / 0.70 -0.88 oz. If you don’t have a digital scale, try and make each piece of dough the same size before baking.
  • Make each piece oval and thick. If you want, you can make a pattern on top using a closed scalloped crimper.
  • Place the cookies on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, about an inch apart, and bake for about 25-30’ until they’re golden brown.
  • When cookies are done, take 7-10 of them and immediately dunk them into the cold syrup.
    Let them soak for about 40 seconds, flipping them over halfway through. Don't soak them too long, though, because they'll fall apart.
  • Remove with a slotted spoon and place on a serving platter. Repeat with the other cookies.
  • Drizzle some honey over the cookies and top with the chopped walnuts.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

  1. You could make the syrup a day ahead and keep it in the refrigerator.
  2. Do not overmix the dough; otherwise the cookies will become tough and hard. Mix until just combined. I usually count up to 15 seconds as I gently mix by hand and then stop.
  3. Don’t put too many cookies in the syrup at the same time, because you won’t have enough room to remove them with the slotted spoon. 
  4. The dough is very greasy, so you might want to wear gloves.
  5. Save any extra syrup in the fridge for your coffee or tea! Or, if you want more syrup in your melomakarona, just pour some more on the bottom of the plate the next day and let the cookies soak it up.
  6. These cookies will last for up to 2 weeks as long as they’re covered.
©Pastry Wishes

 

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